Simple Ways to Encourage Your Child’s Curiosity Through Nature

Simple Ways to Encourage Your Child’s Curiosity Through Nature

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Because your child is naturally curious, how do you encourage their curiosity?  Here are some simple ways to encourage their learning through nature.

Children are naturally inquisitive and want to learn about the things around them.  Their minds are growing and expanding and as a parent, you have the ability to encourage that growth in areas that will help them develop compassion, gentleness, and kindness.

Teaching children about the world around them and to be interested in nature will help them develop these positive character traits as they are growing.

I will never forget the picture in my memory of my daughters catching fish in their bare hands as our pond overflowed after a huge rainstorm.  They desperately tried to catch all the fish that had overflowed out of the pond and put them back in the pond.

This act of compassion and kindness was one they had learned from lots of interaction with nature, animals and learning about being gentle.

Child on path torwards mountains

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How Do You Teach a Child to Love Nature?

  • Exposure

Children learn from exposure.  The more opportunities they have to learn and ask questions, the more they will develop an interest in a topic.

If your child has hands-on experiences with nature and is able to interact, they will be more likely to learn more.

Take your children to places where they will encounter wildlife.  Going to the zoo, farm or petting zoo allows children to interact with animals that they might not have at home.  At least at our house, we don’t have a giraffe!

Read the signs to or with them and help them connect the animals and information with information they can relate to.

Ask questions.  “Why does a prairie dog live in the ground?”  “Why does a peacock fan out his tail?”  “Watch the chicken.  Do his eyes look straight out in front of him or do they look side to side?”

Allow your children to ask questions.  If you don’t know the answer, help them find the answer.  This teaches children that every question is a good one and just because you don’t know the answer doesn’t mean it’s not important.

 

Some of our favorite places to gain exposure to animals…

  • National Parks (especially Teton National Park and Yellowstone)
  • Zoo
  • Petting zoo
  • Farm
  • Animal shelter
  • Wildlife refuge
  • Fish hatchery
  • Aquarium
  • Visit a pond in the spring and look for tadpoles, frogs, and baby fish
  • The ocean (seals, fish, shells, whales, birds, raccoons, etc)
  • Backyard bird/squirrel feeders
  • Beehives
  • Ant hill in your driveway
  • Bird nest in your porch
  • Spider webs on your fence

 

  • Example

Children learn from the example of the people around them.  If they see you talking on the phone, they will naturally mimic your behavior.

If they see you taking an interest in the world around them and engaging them with questions and information, children will develop an interest in that as well.

Train your own eyes to watch for wildlife.  It takes some practice, but once you start looking for deer or other animals, you will notice them as you are driving.

One of our favorite family vacations is going to Teton National Park.  The best part about the trip is watching for wildlife.  We have a couple of favorite haunts where we often see bears, moose, beavers, and other large animals.

We have looked for wildlife so much that we know exactly what we are looking for and often see animals that others don’t see.

  • Opportunity

Providing time and space for children to engage with the world around them will encourage their inquiry.  When you spend time together hiking or camping, there will be opportunities to explore the nature around you.  This can provide lots of conversations about why, how, when, etc.

Spending time outside also provides more possibilities to see and observe the nature around you.

Sitting on the porch or inside the living room window looking at the bird feeder can provide a setting to see different species of birds or squirrel antics.

Watch the stars at night, learn about the trees around you and why some lose their leaves in the fall.  Find out what wildlife lives in your neighborhood and watch for it.

We recently had a bobcat wander through our backyard.  It was only visible for a few minutes and if we hadn’t been looking out the window, we would have missed it completely!

We’ve had several fawns raised in our backyard, coyotes wander through, we’ve heard a fox, and seen raccoons on our back porch.

And, of course, we have squirrels at our birdfeeders!  Every spring they bring their babies and teach them how to climb up the bird feeder poles!

Observe the birds in your backyard and try to find out where their nests are without disturbing them.   Take the time to stop and watch and observe with your children.

chipmunk with flowers in background

  • Tools of the Trade

When your children begin to be aware of the world around them, you may need a few accessories to help them learn and discover.

Bird books or nature guide books are great to help children develop the research skills they will need for many things in life.  There are also great bird identification apps for your phone.

Teach your children how to identify the backyard birds and keep a list of the different varieties.  Listen to their songs or chirps and learn to identify birds by the sounds they make.

Binoculars are a must if you want to see wildlife.  You can get large or small binoculars, but if you want your children to be able to see things, make sure the binoculars will adjust to small faces as well as large.

Encourage your children to journal about what they see.  Draw pictures of the animals or birds and write descriptions of where they saw them, what they were eating or doing.  Go on an exploration like Lewis and Clark and document the things around you.

Books about how to draw animals will also help your children as they learn about animals or birds.  These books are our favorite drawing books and they have a simple step by step instructions but the animals look realistic and simple.

Drawing animals and birds also helps a child (or parent) learn about the details of the animal and take note of different things than simply seeing a deer in the backyard or a bird at the bird feeder.

Drawing tools such as good drawing pencils, colored pencils or markers make the process of journaling or drawing what you see fun and exciting.

Nature journals are best if they are portable and they lay flat for ease of writing or drawing.  Find one that will fit in the backseat of the car or in your child’s backpack so that it goes with you when you travel.

Photograph the nature around you.  Purchase a good, inexpensive digital camera that your child can use to take pictures of the things around them.

Depending on their age, they may need some practice and guidance for taking good pictures, but they will enjoy focusing on the bird, animal, or leaf and see it from a different perspective through the lens of a camera than simply walking past it on a trail.

You might be surprised at the pictures your child will take.  They will be a different perspective than the photos you take.

Read stories about animals with your children.  Our very favorite animal storybooks are written by Sam Campbell.  Sam and his wife lived on an island in a large lake in Wisconsin.

The books contain the stories of all the wildlife that lived around them.  We have read these stories over and over again to our children while we were traveling, at bedtime, or just for fun.

The stories capture the love of wildlife that Sam and his wife had and they share the funny escapades of their wildlife neighbors.

A flower press is a fun way to collect different plant leaves and flowers and help your children save the beauty they find around you.  There are so many fun craft ideas using pressed flowers or leaves.

You can make bookmarks, handmade paper, candles, artwork, greeting cards, gift tags and so many other beautiful things.

You may also need a bug jar and a magnifying glass.  If you are learning about small creatures such as bugs, spiders, butterflies, bees, frogs, turtles, feathers and other small creatures or items, your child will enjoy using a magnifying glass to explore a bit closer.

One summer, we had a 5-gallon bucket on the back porch for weeks that was filled with tad-poles.  My girls would reach in and let the tadpoles squirm around in their hands in the water.

They spent hours watching them, playing with them and then discovering their tiny little legs and their shrinking tails.

Be prepared!  Once your children discover a love of nature, you may need to give up your favorite Tupperware bowl for a home for a turtle for some time of observation.  Or your favorite spaghetti spoon may become a fish catcher for minnows or tadpoles.

Be ready to explore and learn right along with your children and encourage their exploration.

How does a love of nature build positive character in children?

Learning about the creatures around you, helps your children develop compassion.  If you have been feeding the birds and then the first snow comes and the bird feeders are empty, your children can empathize with the cold and hungry birds and want to feed them.

When you care about something, you are going to want to help if you can.  If your children are interacting with animals, they will learn that in order to develop trust, they must be kind and gentle.

Learning about nature also provides opportunities to learn about how God created the animals and birds and how He made them each special with individual differences, strengths, camouflage for protection, and the instincts to raise their babies.

Why should you encourage a love of nature in your children?

Encouraging your children to explore and learn about the world around them through nature is the best way to teach them to care for the world and the resources around them.

They will learn about working hard by watching the ants, they will learn about gentleness by watching a cat bathe another cat, they will learn about faithfulness and loyalty from watching bees in a hive.  They will learn about love from spending time with a dog or cat.

In all of their exploration, you can direct your children to God as the creator of all and talk about the beautiful plan He made in the beginning and the beautiful plan He has in Heaven.

Ultimately, a love of nature easily turns into compassion and gentleness towards other people as well.

These are character traits that you want your child to learn and exhibit.  The ability to think about how someone else might feel or caring for a sick or injured animal or person.

Learning to love learning about things around you helps you be a better steward of resources such as clean water, clean air, protecting the wildlife and people.

Here are 5 simple things you can do today to encourage a love of nature in your child.

  • Hang up a bird feeder

  • Check out a nature book from the library

  • Go on a nature walk/scavenger hunt

  • Pick flowers, leaves or wild grass and bring them in and make an arrangement for your table

  • Order the supplies you need for focusing on nature (shopping list below)

Quick Links for shopping for your Nature Learning Experience!  I’ve done all the work for you!

All you need to do is click and add them to your cart.

Bird Books


Binoculars


Camera


Flower Press


Bug Jar/Box


Magnifying glass


Nature Journal


Pencils, colored pencils, markers, portable pencil case


Drawing books – Draw Write Now


Sam Campbell Wildlife Storybooks


Nature Crafts for Kids Craft Idea Books


Bird Feeders


Squirrel Feeders


Bee Hives


Bat Houses


Flower seeds to attract bees and butterflies to your yard


Bird Houses


Bird Baths


 

 

30 Replies to “Simple Ways to Encourage Your Child’s Curiosity Through Nature”

  1. I still have my first guide book that I got as a child, and I will always keep it as a reminder that a love for nature starts early and stays with you your whole life!

  2. Such great ideas. And you don’t have to go to the countryside to get in touch with nature. You can do a lot of these things in the city. A park with grass is a whole ecosystem. Birds will visit birdfeeders anywhere.

  3. Outdoors in nature is our favorite place to be! There is certainly no end to the resources that are available for outdoor adventures. Thanks for the inspiration!

  4. We’ve got a little one coming soon and I think it’s our top priority to take him camping – starting very young! I didn’t really get too much exposure to the camping life until college and then fell in love with it. Nature does wonderful things for our soul!

  5. Love these ideas! My toddler loves roaming around the yard looking for rocks and nuts on the ground and squirrels and birds in the trees. I’m sure he’d love going on nature hikes when he gets a little bit older.

  6. You are definitely right that having a love of nature is so positive for a child’s upbringing. I love gardening and like to get my son to be part of the gardening process. I also love the idea of schools planting garden’s so kids can learn there too 🙂

  7. You’re right — nature is so important to kids for creativity, curiosity, and more. I am not great about exploring nature when it’s cold outside, so these are great ideas I’ll try to keep in mind this season!

  8. This is a great reminder to me, to focus in with my granddaughter and take time to investigate, enjoy, and learn about nature. My granddaughter is coming this weekend, and I will use several of your tips to build fun Saturday filled with nature activities. Thanks!

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